Search Results for: eggs

How To Freeze Eggs

Remember the good old days when eggs used to go on sale for .25 .50 a carton?  In my area we’re  lucky if we see .99 a dozen.   Eggs have gone up in price, which makes knowing how to freeze eggs an excellent skill to master.

How to freeze eggs for all of your baking needs!

When To Use Frozen Eggs

Eggs that have been frozen are good for baking and recipes such as waffles and pancakes.   Frozen eggs tend to be a little rubbery for scrambled and other egg dishes, but if you want to give them a try, well, you only live once, right?

Fresh eggs from backyard chickens.

How To Freeze Eggs:

1. Crack your eggs into a bowl and whisk them.  You aren’t trying to make them light and fluffy with lots of air, as a matter of fact, the less air the better.  You just want the white and yolk well mixed.

2. Put about 3 T of your egg mixture into an ice cube tray.  I used baby food trays because I know that they are BPA free.

3.  Stick your tray of eggs into the freezer and let them freeze.

Freezing eggs in ice cube trays

4.  After they are frozen, pop them out and put them in a zip-lock bag, and stick them back into the freezer.  DATE YOUR BAG and write down HOW MANY CUBES MAKE AN EGG.  You may THINK you will remember this, but you won’t.  Trust me. (ahem)

5. Speaking of how many cubes equal and egg…..two ice cubes is about 1 egg.  Just remember how many eggs you mix, and how many ice cube trays it fills up to figure out the cube per egg ratio.

Defrost as many ice cube eggs as you need for your recipe.  Don’t microwave them to defrost them because you will start to cook them.  Use your defrosted eggs right away.

These eggs should last up to a year in your freezer if you use your Food Saver and seal them in Food Saver bags.  About 6 months if sealed in regular baggies.

Shelf Stable Eggs

Freezing eggs not really your thing?  Worry not!  There excellent shelf stable eggs available from Thrive Life.   Easy to add to your baking or scramble up for a quick breakfast!   Remember, eggs are an important part of both your long term, and short term food storage plan.

Yes! You CAN freeze eggs! Here's how!
Want to compost those egg shells?  Here some information on how to do it from eHow.

How To Make The Most Of Survival Seeds

“I bought these survival seeds so that I can grow all my own food when the SHTF”.

I hear this a lot.   Often from people who have never planted  a seed in their entire lives.   Experienced gardeners must be doing a terrific job of making their work look super easy for so many people to figure that if the world were to explode, they could just till up a little bit of dirt, throw out their package of  survival seeds, and viola!, dinner is served.

There’s a whole lot of people in denial out there folks.  A whole lot.

Many of these people couldn’t even tell you what type of seeds are in that survival  seed kit, or if their family even likes those vegetables.

How To Make The Most Of Survival Seeds

 

How to make the most of survival seeds.

1.  Do your researchHow much land you have will determine the type of garden you’ll create.

Suburban homesteader?   Check out All New Square Foot Gardening by Mel Bartholomew,  Mini Farming:    Self-Sufficiency on 1/4 Acre by Brett L. Markham, and The Backyard Homestead by Carleen Madigan.

Urban homesteader?   Grow what you need in pots!  The years my family spent living in a major city in Turkey we grew in pots on our balcony.  The Vegetable Gardener’s Container Bible will get you started.

Another strategy would be to sprout your seeds for fresh eating.  Ann Wigmore leads the way in teaching about sprouts and their health benefits in The Sprouting Book.

Ready for the Big Leagues?   You’ve got your land, paid your dues and ready to go off grid?  Here’s a few resources to take a look at:  The Encyclopedia of Country Living by Carla Emery, John Seymour’s The Self-Sufficient Life, and Abigail R. Gehring’s classic, Back to Basics would be good places to start.

how-to-make-the-most-of-your-survival-seeds

2.  Gain some real life, hands on gardening experience……..NOW.

Gardening has always been a part of my life and my husband grew up tending his grandparents  acres and acres of garden. That’s a lot of gardening hours and we still have years that where certain things are total flops.  Let’s face it, you learn from your mistakes.  Take that time to make those mistakes now, rather than in an emergency situation.

3.  Make friends with other gardeners.

Pick their brains for gardening information specific to your location.   Trust me, gardeners love a willing audience.

what-to-know-before-you-buy-survival-seeds

 

Save your own survival seeds!

Every gardener should learn how to save seeds.

The day might come when ordering your seeds on the internet is no longer a possibility.   Suzanne Ashworth and David Cavagnaro’s Seed to Seed:  Seed Saving and Growing Techniques for Vegetable Gardens., is a must have for any gardener.

 

Want to know my very best advice in regards to creating a plan for using your survival seeds?

HAVE AT LEAST SIX  MONTHS OF FOOD STORAGE ON HAND.
If your personal emergency comes about in the dead of winter, what will you eat?  What will you eat while your garden is making it’s way to harvest?

Food security can’t be found  in a box of survival seeds.   Experienced gardeners would find it challenging to grow everything  to keep body and soul together for a year.   Factor in the amount of physical work growing all your food would require and, well, you get the idea.

Survival Seeds can be an excellent ‘Plan B’

Keep growing those gardens! Plant those fruit trees and berry bushes!   Gardens are a major  component of your food storage plan.   A wonderful, healthy, financial friendly, much needed component, that helps free up much needed cash  you can use to buy your three months supply of what your family normally eats, and then a year’s worth of longer term food storage.

‘Cause thinking when the SHTF you’ll  rip up your lawn and grow everything you need with that box of survival seeds, simply ain’t  going to keep your family fed.

How do you plan to feed your family in case of an emergency?

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Egg Prices are Going Up. Way Up.

Egg prices are going up.  An announcement was made at the beginning of January alerting consumers to a price hike in eggs as California starts requiring hens be raised in spaces big enough to move around in.

States selling eggs to California must also meet these standards in order to continue doing business in the Golden State.

*this post contains affiliate links

Less Chickens = Less Eggs = Prices Going Up

So much for thinking chickens would suddenly be living out their days in luxury digs with prices staying the same.   With the new standards, chicken farmers are sending their flocks to their Heavenly Rewards rather than building new, larger buildings to house the hens in.

Less chickens  mean less eggs, which  drives up prices. It’s the whole cost vs. demand thing.

How Thrive Makes Storing Eggs EASY!

I’m thinking it’s a good time to make sure my preps include some shelf stable eggs.   Thrive makes this easy with their great tasting scrambled egg mix!  Thrive Scrambled Egg Mix.

One way to combat rising food prices is to purchase on sale and in bulk.  This allows you to ‘lock in’ the price of a food.   Purchasing enough to last a year will give you amble opportunity to begin looking for a good sale price before you run out. Doing this allow you to avoid being victim of high prices.

How To Use Thrive Powdered Eggs

Pro Tip: :  How do you rehydrate powered/dehydrated eggs?  It’s easy.  In any recipe calling for eggs use 2T. dry egg powder + 3 T. water per fresh egg.  Mix well.

Other Brands Of Shelf Stable Eggs for Long Term Storage

OvaEasy are actually freeze dried egg crystals.  The shelf life per unopened bag is 2 1/2 years.

Made from only chia seeds and garbanzo beans, Neat Egg is an excellent egg replacement  for those who choose not to eat animal products.

Are  egg prices going up where you live?  Do you store eggs?   Do you use powered eggs in place of fresh ones?

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Creating A Support System for Personal Emergencies and Disasters

Sadly, many of my friends are going through their own personal emergencies and disasters: loss of a job, death in the family and even a good friend starting breast cancer treatments as a single mom. Thankfully, I feel blessed to be a part of each of their support system as I know they would do the same for me if the situations were reversed. Each personal disaster that I see my friends go through brings me back to the heart of what this site is about: preparing for the unexpected. Too often “preppers” are painted with a Doomsday brush. But really, the majority of us that prep are more trying to be ready for those unexpected bumps in the road that involve your own family.

How to create support system for personal emergencies

This post is about creating  and sustaining your own personal support system. I am blessed to have a group of friends who would be at my door in seconds with meals for my family, rides for my kids, or a mop to help me clean. I know. I have seen them do all of that for members of our group. Many churches organize groups like this as “relief societies”, mine is an informal network of friends. It doesn’t matter how you find your group. The point is you need to either make one or get involved in one.

Sit down today and walk through your average day in your head. Now, imagine, you had to have an emergency surgery and couldn’t be there. Make a list of all the possible things you could need help with and who could be there to fill in for you. If you are relying on a spouse, remember, they are going to need help helping you!

  • Who is going to get the kids up, dressed and feed them breakfast in the morning? Can your spouse take a few days off? Do you have vacation time or sick time set aside for that? Or extra money put away to cover the time off? Could one of your parents help? Are the kids old enough to do it themselves if that just meant pouring cereal (have some extra on hand?). Have you taught your kids how to make themselves very simple meals like scrambled eggs?
  • How will they get to school? Do you have a back up like a carpool group? Or a neighbor? If they ride a bus do you know your neighbors well enough to look after your kids at the stop? If you homeschool do you have independent lessons they can be working on? Or learning activities like puzzles or a fun computer game that they can do until you are better?
  • Who will cook dinner? Do you have a nice stack of take out menus around? Do you have freezer dinners (hint: I am posting some great recipes for this weeks Sunday Skills)? What about your support group?
  • What about your pets? Do you have enough extra food around for them? A neighborhood kid who could walk them and clean up after the dog in the yard?
  • Do you have someone who could take over your role at work? PTA? Church? Really wherever people count on you…do you have a backup?

The above questions are meant to get you started thinking about who you could count on for back up for a short time. But what happens if your emergency is a bit longer? I have a friend with 5 kids who broke her leg in multiple places this year. Her recovery process is likely to be 6 months. What if you needed help for that long?

How to Create or Find a Support System

The old saying “To Have a Friend Means You Must First Be A Friend” comes to mind. Have you volunteered to bring dinners, give rides, or otherwise help a friend in need? Do you check on your elderly neighbors regularly? Offer to take them to the store or pick up things for them? Same thing for the mom with a new baby! Creating an attitude of community caring in your life will go a long way when its your turn to need help. If you belong to a church, talk to them about spearheading a committee for this. How about just talking to your friends and creating a circle of people that want to give and get this type of support? For the friend with a broken leg, we used the service Take Them A Meal to plan out who could help with dinner. My friends used a simple spreadsheet in google docs when I needed help this summer. It’s not hard. It’s about being there. And about understanding that no matter how prepared we are, everyone needs help now and then. Make a support network part of your prepping plans!