Freeze Dried Meals in a Jar: Sausage Potato Soup

Freeze Dried Meals in a Jar provide nutrition, convenience, and long term storage ability to your food storage plan.   Boil a pot of water, dump in the ingredients, and viola!, dinner is served in record time.  Even if that dinner is made for a year later!

How to make Freeze Dried Meals in a Jar

What makes Freeze Dried Meals in a Jar so fantastic?  Imagine coming home too tired to cook, and the family wanting to eat…..NOW.  You boil water.  Dump in the contents of the jar.  Stir.  Viola.  It’s dinner baby.  It’s way healthier than fast food, AND at about $10.00 a jar for a family of 4, CHEAPER too.

You are learning to use your food storage, saving money, creating shelf stable, long lasting meals for your storage, and making your life easier.   We aim to please, here at Simply Preparing.

Freeze Dried Meals in a Jar Recipe using Thrive Life Foods

Sausage Potato Soup


Thrive Freeze Dried Ingredients:

1 C. Freeze Dried Sausage
1 C. Dehydrated Potato Chunks
1/3 C. Freeze Dried Sweet Corn
1/4 C. Freeze Dried Onions
1/3 C. Dehydrated Carrot Dices
1/3 C. Freeze Dried Peas
6 TBSP Chicken Bullion

Ready to try Thrive? I would love it if you bought using my link so I can grow my food storage as well.

Buy Thrive Freeze Dried Foods

Ingredients Needed From Your Pantry

1 TBSP Parsley
1 TBSP Garlic Powder
1/4 tsp. Salt
1/8 tsp Pepper
4 TBLS Butter

Bring three quarts of water to a boil.  Add in the freeze dried ingredients along with the garlic powder, parsley, salt and pepper.  While these ingredients simmer, make your thickening sauce.

 

How To Make A Thickening Sauce (Roux)

(Important Note:  The ingredients for the thickening sauce/roux will NOT be part of what you actually put into your jars.  These are items you’ll need to have on hand in your fridge/pantry to complete this meal.)

1/4 Cup flour

1 C reconstituted Powdered Milk

2TSPB Butter

 

Melt butter in a small pan over a low temperature.  Whisk 1/4  C. flour and allow to cook for a minute, whisking constantly.   Pour in 1 C. (reconstituted) Powdered Milk.  Stir until thick and bubbly.

Add a bit of your soup liquid to your thickening sauce to thin it out some.  Then add everything back into your soup and stir.  Allow to simmer for a few minutes before serving with a garnish of  Freeze Dried Parmesan Cheese.

When putting together the ingredients for your Freeze Dried Meals in a Jar, you also need to add an oxygen absorber to each jar or vacuum seal each jar.  Personally, I do both.  This will give you at least a year’s storage for this recipe.

Why You Should Have Freeze Dried Meals In A Jar In Your Food Storage Stash

Beans and rice might keep a body and soul together, but they are not going to be able to do much when food fatigue sets in.  Food fatigue is the idea that food is food and when you have nothing else you will eat it, whether you like it or not.

While this may be true to some extent, it is important to stock a variety of foods, as well as some meals that are tried and true family favorites.  That’s where Freeze Dried Meals in a jar come into play.   Having to eat beans every day for a month straight might just be what brings you down not only physically, but psychologically as well.

DIY Freeze Dried MREs for But Out Bags

Shelf stable meals such as Freeze Dried Meals in a jar offer variety and simplicity.  You can add fruits and veggies to your family’s diet even during an emergency.  You can even skip the jar and packaged these meals in mylar bags with an oxygen pack to store in your bug out bags.  Think homemade MREs.

How to cook your DIY Freeze Dried MREs

Freeze Dried Meals in a Jar can also easily be cooked over simple bug out stoves using items found in typical 72 hour kits.  Just make sure you’ve got your water stored too!

How are you preparing to feed your family in case of emergency?   Do you have Freeze Dried Meals in a Jar in your preps?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Original Recipe by Amber Spackman   Modifications by me.
**Photo Credit:  Ladyheart

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Why You Should Store Food NOW.

I’ve had people ask me why they should store food now rather than waiting to see if a crisis event takes place.    Many would rather have their money earning interest in a bank so that if the s-ever does hit the fan, they have the finances to deal with their new normal.  Having a stash of cash is important in an emergency situation.  However, I believe that the time to get your tangibles is before the crisis, not after.  There really are times when food is more valuable than money.

Store Food

 

How do I come to this conclusion?

* You can’t eat money.  In times of crisis, store shelves will be wiped out in the blink of an eye.  It won’t matter how much money you have on hand if there’s nothing around to purchase.

* Items from your food storage will be highly valued barter items.  Cash stands a huge chance of being devalued to the point of worthlessness.

* Food prices are only going up.  And up.  And after that, they’ll go up some more.   When you store food now, using a variety of techniques, it’s like money in the bank that is actually earning interest in the form of  being exempt from rising food costs.

* A one dollar package of humble garden seeds will increase the value of that buck 20x in the form of fresh veggies, compared to vegetables purchased at a grocery store.  Where else can you increase the value of that greenback in such a dramatic way within one mere growing season?

Nobody can control the economy.  But we can control how it affects our lives.  Storing food is one way to prepare for what ever uncertainties the future may hold.

Do you store food in case of emergency?

*Photo Credit:  Visual Hunt

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The Pros and Cons of MREs

Most preppers and outdoor enthusiasts are familiar with MREs. MRE stands for meal, ready-to-eat, and they are most common as field rations for the military. MREs are meant to feed one individual for one meal. Fortunately, these meals in a bag or box have come a long way since hardtack, cans of Spam, and freeze-dried meat. Modern MREs offer a wide range of foodstuffs and now include heating elements, desserts, and beverage powders. There are even MREs made for cold weather that pack plenty of extra calories when you need them to stay warm.

All of the items included in modern MREs make them extremely popular for preppers and outdoor recreationists alike, including campers and backpackers. You might be wondering, though, if MREs are right for you as part of an emergency preparedness kit. Before you run out and buy cases of MREs to have when disaster strikes, it is helpful to know both the advantages and disadvantages of these.

pros and cons of mresThe Pros:

  • Versatility – Modern-day MREs offer a wide variety of options when it comes to food. MREs from the U.S. military offer a great diversity that was missing even just a few years ago. You can now select those with chicken, beef, or pork as the main dish or vegetarian meals. There are also a large variety of carbohydrates like pasta, rice, oatmeal, and applesauce. MREs come in breakfast, lunch, and dinner choices.

  • Heating Elements – MREs now come with some kind of heating element so that you can have a hot meal even if you don’t have access to a stove, and these heating elements come right in the bag. This makes MREs perfect when you are left without electricity or when you find yourself out in the wildness miles from civilization.

  • Sheer Number of Items – MREs come packed with numerous food items including a main dish, side dishes, desserts, energy bars, beverage flavoring powders, instant coffee, and, of course, the customary salt, pepper, toilet paper, spoon, chewing gum, and Tabasco sauce if you’re lucky. What is included in one MRE differs immensely, and no two are ever exactly alike!

  • Portability – MREs can be easily thrown into a backpack or bug out bag. Once you open a MRE, you have everything you need for a meal.

The Cons:

  • The Amount of Calories – Since MREs were designed for soldiers in combat, one meal contains a large amount of calories. Each MRE contains about 1200 calories and that makes it great for outdoor pursuits but hard on the stomach for more sedentary individuals. An entire MRE should probably not be consumed all in one sitting.

  • Weight – MREs weigh more than freeze-dried meals. It is something to take into consideration if you are thinking about packing them around all day.

  • Cost – MREs are more expensive compared to fresher foods and freeze-dried meals. On average, a single MRE costs around $8 to $10, and a case of twelve can cost around $80 to $100.

  • Availability – MREs are not something that you can find at your local grocery store. Special military supply stores or outdoor stores might carry them but they will probably be limited in quantity and variety. Thanks to the Internet MREs are now available from several online retailers. If you order online, however, you will obviously pay more for shipping.

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